Training Programs—
USABlueBook offers programs that are written and presented in a very simplified format. Timely subject matter, superb animated interactive verbal presentations, visual demonstrations, and even hands-on workstations where appropriate, all encourage the attendees to be an active player in the learning process. These programs are designed, written and presented for water/wastewater operators with varying levels of work experience and skill. Even the most advanced operators find these programs entertaining, informative and skill enhancing.
  • Don Van Veldhuizen
    Eastern United States
    Don’s 30 years in the water and wastewater field supply him with the tools he needs as a technical adviser for numerous water and wastewater systems. He is certified in Water Treatment, Distribution, and Wastewater Collections and Treatment. Don is a Certified Environmental Trainer (CET) with the National Environmental Training Association (NETA).
    Click here to see a list of the workshops and seminars that Don offers.
    To contact Don regarding training in the Eastern US, click here.
    • Workshop/Seminar Summaries
      Water/Wastewater
      • Alternate Disinfection
        • Are disinfection byproducts causing you grief or is chlorine just not meeting your needs? Check out what other chemicals or processes may suit your particular system better. We will cover UV, ozone and other options that are available today.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 3 hours
      • Chemical feed—Staying with the Flow
        • Whether your preference is diaphragm or peristaltic, learn about operation, maintenance and troubleshooting of these workhorses of water treatment. You will also be able to determine which pumps will work best in your application and which pumps to avoid. Also, we will discuss calculating doses and setting the controls of the equipment. If 3 or more hours in length, class also involves a hands on operation and maintenance section of popular chemical feed pumps.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 6 hours
      • Chlorination
        • What makes chlorine such a good disinfectant, and why it is used so extensively? The discussion will involve the advantages and disadvantages with chlorine as a gas, liquid and solid. Also, determining the best form for your system will be discussed. You will learn feed techniques, preservation and safety associated with chlorine. Great class when combined with Chemical Feed—Staying with the Flow.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 3 hours
      • De-chlorination
        • This class is an overview of different chemicals and/or means used to de-chlorinate water and wastewater. It addresses when and where you should use which type of chemical and the safety and environmental issues that need to be addressed. We will also discuss the need and methods to monitor the efficiency of the de-chlorination.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 2 hours
      • Line locating—The Basics Uncovered
        • Locates are done in every system. Learn the science behind the locator and how to use that science to your benefit. This two-part class will first discuss the locator and some tricks of the trade that may assist you in those difficult locates. The second part will be a hands-on demonstration locating pipes in the system.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 4 hours
      • Math—Honing Your Skills
        • A math class that is applicable to both the water and wastewater industry. A practical look into the tool that can solve challenges in your treatment plant. Learn the two basics tools in the toolbox that is called math. Great for operator use or preparation for the certification exam.
          Timeline: Minimum 2 hours to maximum of 3 hours
      • The Flow of Water
        • An overall view of the water and wastewater industry using the hydrological cycle as a comparison. Treatment technologies, storage, distribution and collections will be discussed. Great class to inform boards, councils and public about the importance of the utilities responsibilities.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 6 hours
      Water
      • Comprehensive Water Audits—Accounting for every drop
        • Learn the difference between a basic water audit and a comprehensive water audit so that your system can best manage its resources. We will discuss leaks, stolen water, meter accuracy, flushing, city uses, fire suppression and distribution maintenance, and how they affect your finances.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 4 hours
      • Distribution—Useful Tools and Practices
        • Knowing what equipment is available is half the battle, but we will also discuss how to use the equipment and trade secrets that will ensure you can do your job proficiently. Mainline flushing, locating and leak detection are a few of the topics we will cover.
          Timeline: Minimum 3 hours to maximum of 7 hours
      • Main Line Flushing
        • Flushing is a necessary yet often overlooked part of distribution maintenance. Determine the frequency and duration for the flushing of your system and the results when flushing is completed. Learn how to set up and execute a flushing plan. What equipment and chemicals (if de-chlorinating) are necessary and how to use them?
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 3 hours
      • History of Water Treatment (Ancient Times) Part 1
        • History is valuable. In this class we will address when technologies were first discovered and how those technologies are used today. We will also discuss if those technologies can be applied to current treatment requirements. A few topics to be covered are heat, UV, coagulation and colloidal silver treatments.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 3 hours
      • History of Water Treatment (Storage and Distributions) Part 2
        • History is valuable. In this class we will address when technologies were first discovered and how those technologies are used today. We will also discuss if those technologies can be applied to current treatment requirements. A few topics to be covered are pipe types, corrosion control, valve types, and tank and storage issues.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 2 hours
      • History of Water Treatment (Better Life Through Chemicals) Part 3
        • History is valuable. In this class we will address when technologies were first discovered and how those technologies are used today. We will also discuss if those technologies can be applied to current treatment requirements. A few topics to be covered are chlorine and its variations, ozone, fluoride, and chemical feed in general.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 3 hours
      • Leak Detection
        • Learn the useful and practical side of leak detection so you can keep the revenue generating water flowing. Discussions will include leak surveys, isolating leaks, use of acoustic locators, and correlators.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 3 hours
      • Rates vs. Audits
        • Determine whether a rate adjustment is needed or closer utility management will meet the financial needs of the system before approaching the public. Basic and comprehensive audits and types of rate structures will be discussed.
          Timeline: Minimum 2 hours to maximum of 4 hours
      • Setting Water Rates (Structures and Strategies)
        • Is your system operating in the Red or Black? Learn how to determine and set fair and equitable water/wastewater rates. Also discussed will be how to sell the need for a rate increase to the board, council and public.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 3 hours
      • Water Conservation from the Utilities Standpoint
        • Saving water is everyone’s business. Determine the direction your system needs to address in production, maintenance and/or repairs to save water in order to extend the expected life of your system. Discuss public contributions to saving water and how to implement user-based water saving devices. Finally, what you should do as a system manager when water rationing becomes required.
          Timeline: Minimum 2 hours to maximum of 6 hours
      Wastewater
      • Activated Sludge
        • What is activated sludge and why is it used so extensively? Learn about the process and why it is such an effective way to quickly treat large quantities of raw wastes. We will also discuss means of control both physical and biological.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 6 hours
      • Activated Sludge (Process Control)
        • Learn all variables for controlling the activated sludge process and when to adjust each in order to achieve the best possible treatment. Seminars typically include hands on training of process control lab test and application of the results.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 14 hours
      • Dewatering and Thickening
        • Excess water is money. Reduce cost associated with transportation and disposal of your solids by eliminating water. This class will provide an overview of gravity thickeners, Dissolved Air Flotation (DAF) systems, gravity belts, presses and centrifuges, and the advantages and disadvantages of each.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 3 hours
      • Filament Control Action Plan
        • Filaments are beneficial up to a point. When they become a detriment, learn what the causes of most filament issues are and the different methods of control. From nocardia to microthrix parvicella, what are the options on how to proceed before a violation occurs? Short term and long term options will be discussed.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 2 hours
      • Lagoons—Managing the Waterfront
        • Learn the basics for operation and maintenance of lagoon systems. We will discuss the warning signs of changes in treatment and overcoming the difficulties in dealing with the limited control.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 3 hours
      • Nutrient Removal and Monitoring
        • Nitrogen and phosphorous are becoming an important issue in many areas of the country. This session will address causes and effects of nutrients in receiving streams and treatment technologies to remove them prior to discharge. It is a necessity to maximize treatment by monitoring different areas the process stream. We will show the where, what and how to properly evaluate your treatment process for effective removal.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 3 hours
      • Solids Balance Basics
        • No matter what type or size of activated sludge system you are operating, take home some helpful and time saving techniques to optimize plant performance. Advantages and disadvantages will be discussed concerning Food/Microbe ratios (F/Ms), Sludge Retention Times (SRTs) and Mean Cell Residence Times (MCRTs). Learn which method is best for your situation and how to minimize the operations lab time.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 4 hours
      • Thickening & Anaerobic Digestion Basics
        • A review of common equipment used for the thickening process and the advantages and disadvantages of each. Learn the warning signs of digesters upsets, why they occur, and what to watch for to avoid them.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 4 hours
      • Troubleshooting Activated Sludge
        • Learn the techniques to approach and solve challenges with the activated sludge process. The discussion will involve prevention, short term and long term solutions, and hardening your system to prevent or absorb future shocks and upsets.
          Timeline: Minimum 2 hours to maximum of 4 hours
      • Wastewater Safety
        • Whether it be biological, chemical or physical, the wastewater profession has more hazards than most professions. This class covers those potential hazards, confined spaces, mitigating hazards, personal protection equipment and more making your workplace a safer place to be.
          Timeline: Minimum 1 hour to maximum of 3 hours
  • John Schwartz
    Western United States
    John brings over 30 years of water and wastewater experience to the training room, including roles as a Circuit Rider, trainer and technical advisor for the California Rural Water Association. He is certified in Water Treatment and Distribution, and has a Utility Management Certification (UMC) for Water and Wastewater Management from NRWA’s Water University.
    John’s list of workshops and seminars is coming soon. Please contact him for his current offerings.
    To contact John regarding training in the Western US, click here.